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A basic study of the specialised writing and editing industry in the Netherlands

Dutch tulips

To find out more about the specialised writing and editing industry in the Netherlands, and about the effect that the European Union is having on the industry, I conducted a basic study in which I approached three Netherlands-located specialised writing and editing societies: EASE, SENSE, and STIC. EASE is the European Association of Scientific Editors, with about 7.5% of its members in the Netherlands (its presidency, however, is in the Netherlands). SENSE is the Society of English Native-Speaking Editors, with strong editing and translating components to its membership. STIC is the Studiekring voor Technische Informatie en Communicatie, the Dutch technical information and communication society. SENSE and STIC are based in the Netherlands and contain a majority of Netherlands-located members. In each case, I contacted the society leadership and asked to interview a member of the leadership.

The society that had the most information, and that had collected information from members via member profiles that are updated annually, and via occasional membership surveys was SENSE. EASE was second in terms of having information in a membership database, and being willing to make an educated guess in an area in which the membership database for the society was not detail-rich. STIC did not have a detail-rich member database, and the interviewee gave an opinion and made educated guesses with some reluctance. Nevertheless, I collected information about the societies and about perceptions of the effect that the European Union is having on the specialised writing and editing industry. In addition, the interviewees gave me the names of related societies, some of them Netherlands-located.

Society information

For basics, I discovered that societies are active here. Roughly, the largest Netherlands-located memberships are in SENSE, followed by STIC, and then finally EASE. This is because the Netherlands membership of EASE is much lower than its total membership. (Disclosure: I do not have statistics for the x-Netherlands membership of the other societies, but my understanding from the interview process is that it is not the majority of either society.)

The gender split in the specialised writing and editing industry averages 65% female to 35% male. (This calculation uses accurate data from SENSE, and an educated estimate from EASE. If we include the more loosely formulated STIC estimated split of 50–50, the average becomes 60–40 female to male across the societies.) In comments made by the SENSE interviewee, the underlying questions of pay scale, work flexibility, and language skills are identified as supporting the case for a female domination of the specialised writing and editing industry.

Each of the societies is active regularly, hosting an annual general meeting (AGM) as well as regular specialised events for members (mostly educational, one or two social). Each society has a publication that accompanies membership. Slightly unusually, STIC members receive the same publication (TEKSTblad) as another Netherlands-located specialised writing and editing society (TekstNet). Despite the resemblance in name, however, TekstNet has no involvement in the production of TEKSTblad, which is a fully independent Dutch magazine for technical and other writers. Both SENSE and EASE have a group email list for member discussion, employment offers, and immediate specialised help with work in hand. STIC uses an externally established group email list for this purpose. Each society has a website.

Profession and industry splits

Members of EASE practice the most industry-specific work with an estimated 40% focussed in each of medicine and science. STIC follows with an estimated 30–40% focussed on software and 20% in machinery and hardware. SENSE has the most reliable figures spreading the SENSE membership industry focus across several areas, notably law (20.8%), science (18.5%), art and literature (18.5%), medicine (17.6%), finance (14.4%), and publishing (9.7%).

Members of EASE have an estimated professional focus of 90% editors, 35% academic researchers, 20% writers, and 15% translators. STIC estimates that the vast majority of its membership is writers, with several editors and a few trainers. STIC comments that the society is a group for information designers, which is a professional category. Again, SENSE has the most accurate data with 89% editors, 79% translators, 41% writers, 35% trainers, and 1% students.

Effect on the Netherlands-located industry by the European Union

The second part of the interview asked for an opinion on the state of the specialised writing and editing industry in the Netherlands; then asked for an opinion on the effect that the European Union is having on the specialised writing and editing industry in the Netherlands. Since the three societies have shown that they cover fairly different areas within the specialised writing and editing industry, the responses in this part of the interview can be taken to be only loosely inter-related. Ratings were uniformly out of a scale of five where five represents the best value answer to the question, one represents the worst value answer to the question, and three represents the neutral value answer to the question. Descriptive text accompanied the rating to help the interviewee answer the question. Text in square brackets is mine.

EASE and SENSE rate the specialised writing and editing industry in the Netherlands as very good (4/5), with challenges in industry sectors and employment at good levels. SENSE comments that this rating is based on experience in scientific editing, and contact with editors in the business and commerce, banking, and information technology (IT) sectors. STIC rates the specialised writing and editing industry in the Netherlands as endangered (2/5), citing that technical communication has always been endangered, is not taken seriously in the Netherlands, and that there is a marked unwillingness [by employers] to pay for it.

Keeping the new European Union member states out of consideration, I asked the interviewees to rate the specialised writing and editing industry in the Netherlands against the rest of northwest Europe. EASE and STIC rate the industry at par with the rest of northwest Europe (3/5). EASE comments that the industry is at about the same state in the Netherlands as it is in the United Kingdom, in Germany, and in the Scandinavian countries. STIC cites that the same complaints about the technical authoring industry are heard in Germany and Sweden, and that the technical authoring industry is in a marginally better state in the United Kingdom because the ISTC [UK-located society] does not complain about the same things. SENSE rates the specialised writing and editing industry as in a better state than the rest of northwest Europe (4/5), citing a trend in the Netherlands to more international publishing due to a booming economy and a predominance of non-native English speaking writers who need assistance with writing.

Keeping the recently-joined European Union member states out of consideration, I asked the interviewees to rate the effect that the European Union has had on the specialised writing and editing industry in the Netherlands since 2000. EASE rates the effect of the European Union on the industry since 2000 as suffering some negative change (2/5), with challenges receding in some sectors, and some talent migration away from the Netherlands. EASE comments that the European Union has facilitated mergers led by large academic publishers such as Reed-Elsevier and Springer. Thus, mergers have occurred, which usually result in unemployment. STIC rates the effect of the European Union on the industry since 2000 as no real change (3/5). SENSE rates the effect of the European Union on the industry since 2000 as gaining some positive change (4/5), with some gains in employment, renewed challenges in some sectors, and some talent migration to the Netherlands. SENSE comments that the European Union has definitely made a difference in the positive sense particularly in the banking, insurance, IT, environment, and energy sectors. SENSE goes on to comment that European Union directives are becoming increasingly important in directing national laws, so communication within the European Union and other countries has increased, thereby increasing the scope of work for translators, editors, copywriters, and trainers. As SENSE goes on to say, the countries of the European Union are all speaking English, which is not their native language. This European Union activity is of significant benefit to the SENSE membership.

Finally, I asked the societies to rate the impact that the new European Union member states will have on the specialised writing and editing industry in the Netherlands in the short term (less than ten years) and the long term (more than ten years). EASE and STIC both foresee no real impact (3/5) on the specialised writing and editing industry in the Netherlands by the European Union either in the short term or the long term. EASE comments that there will be no real impact on writing and editing but that there may be an effect on the printing industry, which may go to new European Union member states. At this time, the print industry in Poland is cheaper than the print industry in the Netherlands. EASE goes on to comment that this effect may not be long lasting because there will probably be balancing forces that will even things out. STIC comments that technical authoring will not be impacted because it is carried out, by and large, either in the local language or in English, which constitutes no real change. SENSE foresees the possibility of some positive impact (4/5) on the specialised writing and editing industry in the Netherlands in both the short and the long term. For the short term SENSE comments that based on 4–5 years of experience editing documents in environmental subjects for use by the European Union, the European Commission, and the European Parliament, the outlook is somewhat positive because the expansion of publishing in English and the requirement of the European Union to have press-ready documents will raise employment somewhat. For the long term, SENSE comments that their rating is highly speculative because developments are too far away.

Conclusions

Societies are regularly active in the specialised writing and editing industry in the Netherlands. They provide their members with educational and social activities. Perhaps most important, through their online forums and email group lists they provide ongoing support for specialised writing and editing industry professionals with work in hand, with employment offers, and with a sense of the larger community. The gender split in the specialised writing and editing industry in the Netherlands is approximately 60% female. The probable causes for this are pay scale, work flexibility, and language skills.

Despite having members in similar industry sectors to EASE, SENSE does not recognize (as EASE does) the publishing industry’s movement towards offshore locations such as India as a significant threat to employment. SENSE recognizes areas in which their membership can migrate professionally and remain both employed and challenged.

STIC indicates that the mood is sombre in the technical authoring industry in the Netherlands. There is a marked perception of being undervalued in the industry sectors that technical authors serve and there is a perceived unwillingness by companies in the Netherlands to pay for documentation services. Technical authoring does not, however, see its industry or professional situation worsening. In fact, the STIC interviewee comments that in the software industry, it is quite possible to sell the added valued of good documentation to an employer.

Most of the societies feel that the European Union will not have a pronounced effect one way or the other over the short and long term on the specialised writing and editing industry in the Netherlands. Overall and outside of this study, we know that a talent migration to the Netherlands is happening due to the enlargement of the European Union. In the societies approached by this study, there is some perception that this talent migration is accompanied by a degree of positive change in the specialised writing and editing industry in the Netherlands, and that there are positive changes to come as the European Union uses the English language more broadly as its lingua franca, or common tongue.

As an additional remark, EASE comments that the influence of technology is far greater on the specialised writing and editing industry in the Netherlands than that of the European Union. Especially, the introduction of word processing and DTP (desktop publishing), which has made the writing and editing tasks shift from the writing and editing professionals back to the text authors. This caused unemployment in the editorial sector. As an example, there was one institute in Wageningen (a university town in the Netherlands) which had a separate publishing house affiliated with the university. The publishing house was abandoned in the 1980s in a shift to put the responsibility for writing, editing, and contacting scholarly journals on the authors. There is a difference between Dutch publications and international publications in that Dutch publications are still edited in the Netherlands or in Belgium. International publication operations are shifting offshore, to India and other countries. Later, EASE contacted me by email with this final comment: “One afterthought I think I should share with you. I told you about outsourcing desk editing (or copy editing, which is the same) to India and other countries, but I did not mention explicitly that this is a consequence of technical innovation. The Internet is of paramount importance in such global reallocation of editorial tasks.”

Because this study did not ask the interviewees about recent technological innovations in writing, editing, and publishing, or the effect of the Internet on the specialised writing and editing industry in the Netherlands, this is out of the scope of this study. But it is important to recognize it. It may be included in a further study when one occurs.

The data tables from the interview process are below this article. All participant names have been removed.

Artist's palette

Data tables from the interview process for the basic study of the specialised writing and editing industry in the Netherlands

Table 1–General data about societies in the Netherlands
Society Interviewee
EASE—European Association of Scientific Editors EASE leadership

Society established 1982. Currently 512 members (Nov 07).

Fluctuation in membership—Yes, five years ago the membership was almost 900. For several reasons, logistic and administrative, quite a few members were lost contact with. Members with Netherlands addresses: 38. Used to be much higher. Vast majority of members are in the United Kingdom: 208.

Not affiliated with any academic programme. University professors and academics are in the society, probably 10% (educated guess).

Predecessor to the society—Yes, there were two: EASE is a merger of European Life Science Editors and EditTerra (editors of earth sciences). Merger happened in 1982. (Period prior to that is unknown, interviewee joined EASE in 1984.)

Society started because of the merger described above.

Annual schedule of society events:

  • Annual general meeting (AGM) with a one-day seminar of interest to the membership [topics such as open access, impact factor] (April/May).
  • Tri-annual conference (every three years), which are four-day events (last one was in June 2006, before that May 2003)—The year of the conference there is no one-day seminar with the AGM.
  • Journal—Four issues per year.
  • Email forum—The society journal contains the EASE science digest and instructions for joining the forum.
  • Web site for consulting/visiting—Static information only.
Society Interviewee
SENSE—Society of English Native-Speaking Editors SENSE leadership

Society established—1990. Currently 341 members (31 Dec 07)—80% at least partly involved in translation.

Fluctuation in membership—Steady growth throughout its life. Around 300 members for a couple of years now. No sudden plunges. Started with about five people, working as editors in the Netherlands. Peer review, feedback, company in a non-native English speaking country. Key full members (native English speakers), and key associate members (non-native speakers) were the first. When about 30 people, they decided to formalize their society.

Not affiliated with any academic programme. Not in the sense of a faculty association. We develop and teach and editing skills course in affiliation with the Instituut Tolken en Vertalen (ITV).

Predecessor to the society—The initial five people. No predecessor. There was nothing like the society in the Netherlands.

Society started when the original five people invited friends and colleagues. “A key member and a handful of other editors who had come to know each other professionally decided to meet on a regular basis. When the group had grown to around 30 they decided to register with the Chamber of Commerce, choose officers, write a constitution and rules. Later a newsletter, talks, workshops, social gatherings, email forum, handbook, website….”

Annual schedule of society events:

  • Annual general meeting (AGM) (March/April).
  • Summer walk (June)—Sometimes one in the north and one in the south of the country.
  • Dinner or Lunch (November).
  • Programme events free for members throughout the year.

Training events costing approximately €150 for the course (break-even basis, instructors are paid, attendance is limited to 16) [editing, copywriting, legal translation, information packaging (language structure and how to make the language as clear as possible)]. Usually in Utrecht. Speakers, panel discussions, peer-sharing fair (software demonstration, tax preparation discussion, time management: work/life balance), special interest groups (SIGs) by region, SENSEmed (a medical SIG) SENSE writers (a writer SIG no longer active).

Does your society conduct employment surveys / salary surveys / other membership surveys? Yes. Most recently in 2005 (membership areas of expertise, membership satisfaction with the society); 2002 (rate survey). Chapter in SENSE handbook – The Myth of Standard Rates

Would you like to conduct such surveys in future? Yes, for the purpose of building a data repository, a wealth of knowledge.

Society Interviewee
STIC—Studiekring voor Technische Informatie en Communicatie STIC leadership

Society established 1960. Currently 115 members (Feb 08).

Fluctuation in membership—Yes, but not since the society was reinvented in the early 1990s.

Not affiliated with any academic programme. Not officially. There used to be a strong academic board.

Predecessor to the society—The society was all but dead in the early 1990s; then revived. Not other than that, as far as the interviewee knows. Key members did a lot of work to revive STIC.

Society started in the late 1980s–early 90s: STIC was trying to kill itself; the old guard resisted change, didn’t believe in new ways of publishing (word processors, DTP [desktop publishing], PCs [personal computers] in general). The interviewee was out of it until was asked to join the board. Now the interviewee is leading a further reinvention.

Annual schedule of society events:

  • AGM (January)—As of next year it will be later in the year so the books can be closed and verified before it is held.
  • One-day conference (June).
  • Week of Technical Communication (November)—This has been changed into a series of events spread out over the year, approximately every two months. Increased attendance was the result.

Does your society conduct employment surveys / salary surveys / other membership surveys? No, they have tried to, through a working group, but failed. Responses not adequate; manpower not adequate.

Would you like to conduct such surveys in future? No, because of the stated reasons, and b/c membership is varied, lots of freelancers. Perhaps 50% work full-time; the rest do not. Membership tells some details when they join but they do not update their status during their years as members.

Related societies in the Netherlands:

  • TekstNet—Great [large] crossover of membership between STIC and TekstNet.
  • TC Europe—Large European group, not Netherlands-based.

Anything specific to your society:

Other STIC activities: TEKSTblad newsletter (a fully independent Dutch magazine for technical and other writers, also received by TekstNet members). STIC Web site, RTFM-Netherlands yahoo group email list does not belong to STIC but it is used as the forum (Key person owns/moderates it—was also on the STIC board, and was involved in STC Netherlands). STIC is a volunteer organisation. “STIC is a very good thing, everyone should join.”

Table 2–Some specialised writing/editing societies

EASE

EASE told me about:

SENSE

SENSE told me about:

STIC

STIC told me about:

Table 3–Statistics from the societies in the study
Number Gender split Profession split Industry split
EASE—512 members

Not identified in the database; educated guess:

F66% : M34%

Not identified in the database; educated guess:

  • Editors—90%
  • Writers—20%
  • Trainers—5–10% (trainers in writing and editing)
  • Translators—15% (especially institutional editors that are also translators)
  • Academic researchers—35%

Not identified in the database; educated guess:

  • Medicine—40%
  • Science—40% (25% of that total in earth sciences)
  • Veterinary science—5%
SENSE—341 members

F64% : M36%

Underlying gender issues: pay scale, flexibility, language skills—all these theories seem to support female dominance.

  • Editors—89%
  • Writers—41%
  • Trainers—35%
  • Translators—79%
  • Students—1%

Based on members updating their profile:

  • Software/hardware—6.5%
  • Heavy industry—1.2%
  • Medicine—17.6%
  • Science—18.5%
  • Academia—5%
  • Journalism—1.8%
  • Art and literature—18.5%
  • Public relations—7.9%
  • Marketing—7.62%
  • Government—0.9%
  • Sports—0.6%
  • Veterinary science—0.6%
  • Construction—0.6%
  • Publishing—9.7%
  • Finance—14.4%
  • Law—20.8%
STIC—115 members

F42.6% (49) : M55.6% (64) : Unknown2.6% (3)

Interviewee says 50:50 is more accurate. The sample is not accurate.

Beyond the scope of the STIC database; educated guess:

  • Editors—Quite a few
  • Writers—vast majority (not all tech writers; includes copywriters)
  • Trainers—Not many
  • Translators—very few
  • Students—very few
  • Information designers—STIC is a society for information designers now.

Beyond the scope of the STIC database; educated guess:

  • Software—30–40%
  • Machinery & Hardware—20%
  • Journalism—10%
  • Public relations & Government & Marketing—15%
  • Publishing—5–10%

Specialised writing and editing in the Netherlands and the European Union

The European Union

Rate the specialized writing/editing industry in the Netherlands:

EASE

Level Description
Excellent Full employment
Fresh challenges across most sectors
tick Very good Occasional periods of unemployment
Some lack of challenge in some sectors
Good Some unemployment
Definite lack of challenge in some sectors
Endangered

Visible or lasting unemployment

Little challenge in any sector

Dead Severe unemployment
No challenges across the industry
Any comments? Not comfortable about using periods of unemployment as an indicator of the industry in the Netherlands.

Sense

Level Description
Excellent Full employment
Fresh challenges across most sectors
tick Very good Occasional periods of unemployment
Some lack of challenge in some sectors
Good Some unemployment
Definite lack of challenge in some sectors
Endangered

Visible or lasting unemployment

Little challenge in any sector

Dead Severe unemployment
No challenges across the industry
Any comments? Based on experience in scientific editing … “Based on experience in scientific editing + contact with editors in business/commerce, banking + IT.”

Stic

Level Description
Excellent Full employment
Fresh challenges across most sectors
Very good Occasional periods of unemployment
Some lack of challenge in some sectors
Good Some unemployment
Definite lack of challenge in some sectors
tick Endangered

Visible or lasting unemployment

Little challenge in any sector

Dead Severe unemployment
No challenges across the industry
Any comments? Always been endangered. Not taken seriously, unwillingness to pay for it, very difficult for technical authors to make a living. Interviewee wishes he/she knew why. Luckiest end up heading a doc mgr. There is not enough opportunity unless you’re really good and set up for yourself, have a certain frame of mind, opportunity, being able to make something out of it.

 

Keeping the new European member states out of it, rate the industry in the Netherlands against the rest of northwest Europe:

Ease

Level Description
Excellent Much better than the rest of northwest Europe
Very good Better than the rest of northwest Europe
tick At par About the same as the rest of northwest Europe
Endangered Struggling to keep up with the rest of northwest Europe
Threatened Far behind the rest of northwest Europe
Any comments? Same as UK, Germany, Scandinavian countries.

Sense

Level Description
Excellent Much better than the rest of northwest Europe
tick Very good Better than the rest of northwest Europe
At par About the same as the rest of northwest Europe
Endangered Struggling to keep up with the rest of northwest Europe
Threatened Far behind the rest of northwest Europe
Any comments? Due to the booming economy and non-native writers. “Comment is drawn from trend in the Netherlands to more international publishing (due to booming economy and predominance of non-native writers (need assistance with language).”

Stic

Level Description
Excellent Much better than the rest of northwest Europe
Very good Better than the rest of northwest Europe
tick At par About the same as the rest of northwest Europe
Endangered Struggling to keep up with the rest of northwest Europe
Threatened Far behind the rest of northwest Europe
Any comments? Hear the same complaints everywhere I go: Germany, Sweden. Marginally better in the United Kingdom. ISTC (in the United Kingdom) is not complaining about the same things. The Sweden organisation is dead as well; thinking of giving up (400 members).

 

Keeping the recently-joined European member states out of it, rate the effect that the European Union has had on the industry in the Netherlands since 2000:

Ease

Level Description
Extremely positive change Brought the Netherlands to full employment
Created fresh challenges across the industry
Brought significant talent migration to the Netherlands
Some positive change Brought some employment to the Netherlands
Created some challenges in some sectors
Brought limited talent migration to the Netherlands
No real change
tick Some negative change A lot of unemployment in the Netherlands
Removed challenges in some sectors
Caused some talent migration away from the Netherlands
Extremely negative change Severe unemployment in the Netherlands
No challenges across the industry
Caused severe talent migration away from the Netherlands
Any comments? The EU has facilitated mergers of large academic publication companies such as Reed-Elsevier and Springer. Springer has taken over several smaller Dutch academic publishing companies, notably Wolters-Kluver. Mergers usually result in economisations, which result in unemployment.

Sense

Level Description
Extremely positive change Brought the Netherlands to full employment
Created fresh challenges across the industry
Brought significant talent migration to the Netherlands
tick Some positive change Brought some employment to the Netherlands
Created some challenges in some sectors
Brought limited talent migration to the Netherlands
No real change
Some negative change A lot of unemployment in the Netherlands
Removed challenges in some sectors
Caused some talent migration away from the Netherlands
Extremely negative change Severe unemployment in the Netherlands
No challenges across the industry
Caused severe talent migration away from the Netherlands

Any comments? Made a difference in a positive sense in banking, insurance, environment and energy fields, etc. European Union directives are becoming more important in directing national laws. Communication back to the European Union and other countries on how to meet challenges, often in English.

Interviewee’s comments: Belgium and Germany and Italy are all speaking English, and it’s not their native language. “Definitely made a difference in the positive sense. Particularly banking, insurance and IT industry are faced with new challenges, along with environment and energy fields. The European Union directives are becoming more and more important in directing national laws; so communication back to the European Union and to other countries on how to meet challenges, thereby increasing scope for translators/editors, copywriters, and trainers.”

Stic

Level Description
Extremely positive change Brought the Netherlands to full employment
Created fresh challenges across the industry
Brought significant talent migration to the Netherlands
Some positive change Brought some employment to the Netherlands
Created some challenges in some sectors
Brought limited talent migration to the Netherlands
tick No real change
Some negative change A lot of unemployment in the Netherlands
Removed challenges in some sectors
Caused some talent migration away from the Netherlands
Extremely negative change Severe unemployment in the Netherlands
No challenges across the industry
Caused severe talent migration away from the Netherlands
Any comments? No real change.

 

What do you think the impact of the new European member states will be on the specialized writing/editing industry in the Netherlands?

Ease

In the short term (<10 years)
Level Description
Extremely positive impact Will bring the Netherlands to full employment
Will create fresh challenges across the industry
Will bring significant talent migration to the Netherlands
Some positive impact Will bring some employment to the Netherlands
Will create some challenges in some sectors
Will bring a limited talent migration to the Netherlands
tick No real impact
Some negative impact Will cause significant unemployment in the Netherlands
Will remove challenges in some sectors
Will cause some talent migration away from the Netherlands
Extremely negative impact Will cause severe unemployment in the Netherlands
Will remove challenges across the industry
Will cause severe talent migration away from the Netherlands
Any comments? No real impact on writing and editing, but may have an effect on the printing industry. Printing may go to the new member states because it will be cheaper to print your journals in the new member states. At this moment, Polish printers are less expensive than Dutch printers. I am unsure whether this is a short term or long term effect because there will probably be counter-balancing forces that will even things out.
In the long term (>10 years)
Level Description
Extremely positive impact Will bring the Netherlands to full employment
Will create fresh challenges across the industry
Will bring significant talent migration to the Netherlands
Some positive impact Will bring some employment to the Netherlands
Will create some challenges in some sectors
Will bring a limited talent migration to the Netherlands
tick No real impact
Some negative impact Will cause significant unemployment in the Netherlands
Will remove challenges in some sectors
Will cause some talent migration away from the Netherlands
Extremely negative impact Will cause severe unemployment in the Netherlands
Will remove challenges across the industry
Will cause severe talent migration away from the Netherlands
Any comments? See the comment in the previous question.

Sense

In the short term (<10 years)
Level Description
Extremely positive impact Will bring the Netherlands to full employment
Will create fresh challenges across the industry
Will bring significant talent migration to the Netherlands
tick Some positive impact Will bring some employment to the Netherlands
Will create some challenges in some sectors
Will bring a limited talent migration to the Netherlands
No real impact
Some negative impact Will cause significant unemployment in the Netherlands
Will remove challenges in some sectors
Will cause some talent migration away from the Netherlands
Extremely negative impact Will cause severe unemployment in the Netherlands
Will remove challenges across the industry
Will cause severe talent migration away from the Netherlands

Any comments? Based on experience of 4–5 years in editing in environmental subjects to be used by the European Union, expansion of requirement for press-ready documents will raise employment. “Based on my experience of 4–5 years in editing documents in environmental subjects for ultimate use by the European Union and the European Commission and the European Parliament. Expansion of publishing in English and the requirement of the European Union for press ready documents will raise employment somewhat.”

In the long term (>10 years)
Level Description
Extremely positive impact Will bring the Netherlands to full employment
Will create fresh challenges across the industry
Will bring significant talent migration to the Netherlands
tick Some positive impact Will bring some employment to the Netherlands
Will create some challenges in some sectors
Will bring a limited talent migration to the Netherlands
No real impact
Some negative impact Will cause significant unemployment in the Netherlands
Will remove challenges in some sectors
Will cause some talent migration away from the Netherlands
Extremely negative impact Will cause severe unemployment in the Netherlands
Will remove challenges across the industry
Will cause severe talent migration away from the Netherlands
Any comments? Highly speculative.
Interviewee’s comments: Rough guess. “Highly speculative – developments too far away!”

Stic

In the short term (<10 years)
Level Description
Extremely positive impact Will bring the Netherlands to full employment
Will create fresh challenges across the industry
Will bring significant talent migration to the Netherlands
Some positive impact Will bring some employment to the Netherlands
Will create some challenges in some sectors
Will bring a limited talent migration to the Netherlands
tick No real impact
Some negative impact Will cause significant unemployment in the Netherlands
Will remove challenges in some sectors
Will cause some talent migration away from the Netherlands
Extremely negative impact Will cause severe unemployment in the Netherlands
Will remove challenges across the industry
Will cause severe talent migration away from the Netherlands
Any comments? What we do is, by and large, either the local language or English. No real change.
In the long term (>10 years)
Level Description
Extremely positive impact Will bring the Netherlands to full employment
Will create fresh challenges across the industry
Will bring significant talent migration to the Netherlands
Some positive impact Will bring some employment to the Netherlands
Will create some challenges in some sectors
Will bring a limited talent migration to the Netherlands
tick No real impact
Some negative impact Will cause significant unemployment in the Netherlands
Will remove challenges in some sectors
Will cause some talent migration away from the Netherlands
Extremely negative impact Will cause severe unemployment in the Netherlands
Will remove challenges across the industry
Will cause severe talent migration away from the Netherlands
Any comments?